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Nykjær Group

Receptor Neurobiology

Research activities are focused towards the functional characterization of a group of type-1 receptors denoted the Vps10p-domain family, or so-called sortlins, that comprises sortilin, SorLA, and SorCS-1, -2, and -3. The receptors are enriched in neurons where they mediate trafficking and signaling of a vast number of ligands such as neurotrophic factors along with their cognate receptors, neurotransmitter receptors, APP, and progranulin. Among many activities, the receptors regulate neuronal cell fate, differentiation, innervation, synaptic plasticity, and learning and memory. Key goals of the Nykjaer lab is to understand their functions in the heathy brain, dissect out their mode of actions, investigate how genetic variation contributes to disease development - in particular of neuropsychiatric disorders and memory impairment -, and to evaluate their potential as drug targets.

Methodologies include transgenic mice and zebrafish, a broad repertoire of molecular, cellular and genetic and viral tools, transcriptomics and (phospho)proteomics, neuroembryology, mouse behavior, electrophysiology and advanced imaging including high-resolution microscopy. In vivo fiber photometry and mesoscale single unit recordings are currently being implemented.

Available projects 

The Nykjær group currently has projects available for Master students and postdocs within the following research areas. 

Functions of the sortilin receptor family in health and disease:

  • Molecular mechanisms underlying memory and psychiatric disorders

Please contact Group Leader Anders Nykjær directly, if interested.

News

Previous news from the research group

News

2013.09.03 | Research news

New publication from Anders Nykjær's group - SORLA-dependent and -independent functions for PACS1 in control of amyloidogenic processes

New results published in Journal of Molecular Biology and Cellular Biology identifies the importance of PACS1-dependent protein sorting for amyloidogenic-burden control via both SORLA-dependent and SORLA-independent mechanisms.

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