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News archive

2019.06.27 | Research news, PoulNissen

Groundbreaking cryo-electron microscopy at Aarhus University reveals the first structures of a protein that maintains cell membranes

Using cutting-edge electron microscopy, researchers from Aarhus University have determined the first structures of a lipid-flippase. The discoveries provide a better understanding of the basics of how cells work and stay healthy, and can eventually increase our knowledge of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

2019.06.24 | Events, News from the management

DANDRITE retreat 2019 for staff & students - 19 August 2019

Our DANDRITE retreat will this year be a 1-day retreat taking place Monday the 19 August 2019 in the beautiful area of Fuglsøcentret in the national park Mols Bjerge at Djursland, just outside Aarhus. All DANDRITE's staff and students are invited for the whole program, which we hope will be stimulating and relevant for everyone. Make sure to sign…

2019.06.21 | News from the management

New job opportunity at DANDRITE - 2-year postdoc position in molecular neuroscience

The position is funded by The Lundbeck Foundation and is initially for two years. The starting date is as soon as possible, e.g. September 1st 2019. The project is a joint collaboration with professor Karen Steel at King’s College in London. With the aim of gaining insight into molecular mechanisms of hearing loss using a newly generated mouse…

Picture of Lasse Reimer, Poul Henning Jensen, Kostas Vekrellis, and Peter Bross

2019.06.17 | People , PoulHenningJensen

Lasse Reimer from Jensen group defended his PhD thesis succesfully on Friday 14 June

Title of Lasse's thises is: ”Inflammation activated kinase PKR directly targets disease-modifying residues within alpha-synuclein and tau for phosphorylation”. The project gives novel insight into the connection between brain inflammation and neurodegerative disorders.

Group photo from Sara’s farewell gathering.

2019.06.13 | PoulHenningJensen, People

Farewell to Sara Elfarrash. Bon voyage to Mansoura, Egypt

DANDRITE wishes Sara Elfarrash all the best. Sara has been part of Poul Henning Jensen's group since 2016 as research assistant and visiting PhD student. Now she is going to finish her PhD back in Egypt. Bon voyage to Mansoura, Egypt.

2019.06.04 | News from the management, Administrative conditions

Welcome to Aisha Rafique, who is new Communications and Scientific Research Coordinator at DANDRITE

Aisha Rafique will be working as The Nordic EMBL Partnership Communications Officer (maternity cover for Annabel Darby), assisting Prof. Poul Nissen in his role as partnership spokesperson and as DANDRITE Strategic Fundraiser. Further, Aisha will assist Prof. Poul Henning Jensen with the coordination of neurobiology-related activities at…

2019.06.04 | People , PoulNissen

Joseph Lyons is prolonged as Assistant Professor in Group Leader Poul Nissen's group

Joseph Lyons continues as Assistant Professor in Group Leader Poul Nissen's group per 1 June 2019. Joseph is working with single-particle cryo-EM studies of P4-ATPase lipid flippases, focusing on structural studies of P4-ATPase complexes with a particular focus on their ATPase coupled lipid transport mechanism and their role in brain cells. The…

Marina Vidotto

2019.06.03 | PoulHenningJensen, People

Please welcome Marina Vidotto who is new intern in Poul Henning Jensen's group

Marina is a student from Italy where she studies Biotechnology at the second year in Udine University. Marina is going to be part of the group for four months from June onwards.

Fig. 7. Schematic illustrating the role of SORLA in the oncogenic fitness of HER2 in cancer cells.

2019.06.03 | Research news, OlavAndersen

Group leader Olav Andersen is co-author on a new paper in Nature Communications

A new paper by Pietilä et al. in Nature Communications, coauthored by Olav Andersen in collaboration with the group of Johanna Ivaska from Turku Bioscience Centre, identified a novel oncogenic function for SORLA that is best known for its association with Alzheimer’s disease.